Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Sepia Scenes #68



When I took photos of some of the gargoyles at Hempstead House in the Sands Point Preserve on Long Island little did I realize that the originals (one is just below) would appear as if they were original sepia shots.



Adding a sepia tone in the usual way (Adobe Photoshop 7) gave me the photo below.



In this case it seems as if the addition of the sepia tone made the photo lose some clarity. Do you agree? I wonder why? Anybody know?


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21 comments:

Shannara said...

Cool with a natural sepia. But I have no answers to your wonderings though.

Mojo said...

He's kinda spooky... but I guess that's the point huh?

kaye said...

It is nearly the same--just a darkening of the shadow on his face is all I see that is different. Great subject for natural sepia.

Small City Scenes said...

Seemingly all thing cement look like natural sepia. Love it. MB

napaboaniya said...

I agree some shots come out looking naturally sepia.
Gargoyle looks a little lost in thought :P

Marie Höglund said...

A natural sepia indeed :-)

Carletta said...

I looked and looked Mary and I agree with Kaye that I only see a darkening of the shadow.
I associate gargoyles with much more grotesque features than this pensive face. :)

Heidi said...

I think I like the natural sepia better too. I am not sure why it would have made it less sharp. Usually sepia brings out the shadows and makes it more detailed.
Great shot for sepia though!

Marice said...

that really works on sepia :) nice editing!

Annie said...

I think the sepia actually enhances the photo that already has such a natural sepia feel to it. Also, the size of the two photos are different. I think if the photos had been the same size the difference might have not been so apparent.

That being said, I just want to say that architural details such as this are always so interesting to find and photograph. thanks for the Hempstead House link. I'll go to see more.

Your EG Tour Guide said...

Really nice natural sepia, MaryT.

awarewriter said...

Raising my hand and waving Teach. Sepia toning only works properly on a monochrome image. Convert to monochrome first, work with the contrasts, etc. and then apply sepia toning.

Remember that sepia toning in the wet darkroom is a process for preserving and toning B&W prints. Keep this in mind when you apply toning in the digital darkroom.

Tash said...

My thought was also - a natural sepia. Interesting subject - lots to absorb in that one.

Tash said...

PS ... I wonder if the Vandals came by there & broke off his nose...poor fellow.

Patti said...

I don't notice a major loss of clarity in the second photo. It's a good sepia subject.

He is kinda spooky, like Mojo said.

Happy Sepia Scenes Wednesday.

allhorsestuff said...

I don't know why that happens...I have noticed that with some of mine too.
I do like that shot!
KK

Cafe Observer said...

Some of these fotos definitely take advantage of the Sepia!

And,
"Friendship is the only cure for hatred, the only guarantee of peace." ~Buddha

That sounds about right. Assuming, of course, people stay friends. No guarantee there.

Paula said...

It prolly took out some of the subtle midtones. I still like it, though.

Self Sagacity said...

Hi there, my second Sepia Scenes. Nice to be able to fit this in with my blog schedule. Those are great photos.

Shelle said...

hi, i just noticed this post on your other blog and had been considering getting out to sands pt..i love it out there. i used to take my first bunch of kiddies when they were little. the sepia shot button looks like roslyn duck pond where is that. that's where i live!

Lew said...

I think it is a little less contrast in the sepia version that makes the difference.